Monthly Archives: Kwiecień 2019

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ChildIN Competence Framework evaluated in Coimbra

Category : Uncategorized

On April 29 2019, a group of 15 Portuguese parents, professionals and Vocational and Educational Training (VET) providers met in Coimbra to evaluate the ChildIN Competence Framework, aiming at defining the knowledge, skills, responsibility and autonomy needed for home-based childminders dealing with children on the autism spectrum. Parallel to this, two other focus groups have also been set in Poland and in France with the same objective.

At the end this activity, which takes the format of a focus group, the following points were highlighted:

A) the criticism of using the term „discovery interview”;

B) the importance of the management of parental expectations by the childminders;

C) the childminders’ scientific and technical knowledge about the autistic child;

D) the importance of autonomy in the childminders’ actions;

E) and the importance of the childminders’ emotional control.

The focus group was driven by Rui Pena, Paulo André and Marco Santos from Academia Comenius, and Elsa Vieira from APPDA Coimbra.

The Competence Framework will define knowledge, skills, responsibility and autonomy needed for home-based childminders dealing with children with autism spectrum disorder: it will also include the learning design (modules design completed with learning outcomes and assessment methods) to achieve defined competences.

Read more about the Focus Group in Poland

Read more about the Focus Group in France


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Polish focus group evaluates ChildIN competence framework

Category : Meetings , News

On April 15 2019,  a focus group took place in Olsztyn, Poland. The focus group was organized to present the first draft of the Competence Framework to the relevant stakeholders so as to ensure that all aspects needed to make the learning modules effectively applicable are taken into account. Parallel to this, two other focus groups have also been set in France and in Portugal with the same objective.

The 12 participant of the ChildIN focus groups represented the following groups:

-Home-based childminders

-Families (parents and relatives) dealing with autism

-Autistic people

-VET providers

-Healthcare professionals

-Social partners

The participants were able to bring their comments to Competence Framework.

The Competence Framework will define knowledge, skills, responsibility and autonomy needed for home-based childminders dealing with children with autism spectrum disorder: it will also include the learning design (modules design completed with learning outcomes and assessment methods) to achieve defined competences.

Read more about the Focus Group in France

Read more about the Focus Group in Portugal


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French professionals and parents evaluate ChildIN standards

Category : Meetings , News

On April 10, 24 French professionals, childminders, parents and other stakeholders got together on a focus group in Nevers to evaluate the ChildIN Competence Framework. The meeting, that was organised by French ChildIN partners IPERIA l’Institut and the Department of Nièvre, aimed at improving the skills and training standards developed by IPERIA. Parallel to this, two other focus groups have also been set in Poland and in Portugal with the same objective.

After a brief presentation of the ChildIN project, the focus group participants spilt into working groups to analyse different case studies from the point of view of the qualities, skills and attitudes of childcare; and knowledge or childcare know-how. Then, each group checked the consistency between the case studies and the ChildIN Competence Framework.

French focus group concludes that the proposed competence framework is “rather consistent with the autistic children and families and childminders’ needs and rights. It highlights two important competence areas that must be developed by the childminder: the communication with the family and the professionals that intervene in the child’s life; and the interactions with the child.

The Competence Framework is a substantial building block for the enhancement of a harmonized training provision for home-based childminders on specific topics, and will set the basis for an improved quality of the home-based care of children with autism: its transferability potential is very high, as the competence framework and learning architecture will be applicable in any country of Europe and beyond.

Read more about the Polish Focus Group

Read more about the Portuguese Focus Group


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ChildIN partners promotes the infinity gesture to mark World Autism Awareness Day

Category : News

On World Autism Awareness Day (April 2), ChildIN partners joined the Autism-Europe’s awareness raising campaign as a way of showing their commitment to promote a society inclusive of all and accepting of diversity.

It is estimated that 7 million people are on the autism spectrum in the European Union. Most of them experience widespread discrimination in many fields of life as well as social exclusion. In order to respond to the daily challenges autistic people face, AE is conducting a Europe-wide awareness raising campaign in 2019, together with its 90 member associations in 26 EU countries, with the motto “A New Dynamic for Autism. I ? autism”.

To raise awareness of the objectives of the campaign, AE encourages supporters to make the infinity symbol, which symbolizes neurodiversity, strength and unity. Making progress to improve life outcomes for autistic people and their families can only be achieved with mutual respect, and understanding. This year, the campaign is also closely linked to the objectives of Autism-Europe’s 12th International Congress, taking place in Nice, France, in September 2019.

Autism is a lifelong disability and all member states face similar challenges across Europe, including providing timely access to diagnosis, education, employment, housing and support for life in the community. A holistic approach is needed to respond to the needs of autistic people, and some member states perform better than others. A EU approach would help reduce inequalities and exchange good practices. It would also provide support for autistic people and their families to exercise their right of free movement more easily.

More information